Category Archives: Generations to Generations

Nutritious Package – Sprouts : salad and sundal


 



The Sprouts Story

Sprouts have become a regular part of our diet, for a few years now. These are the sprouts that I have been using presently. Many whole millets/grams can be sprouted and made into healthy alternatives to snacks and meals.

  • sprouted green gram

  • sprouted black chick pea

  • sprouted fenugreek seeds

Before we move on to the benefits and usages of sprouts, my Sprouts Story is something to be shared.

Initially, the inclusion of sprouts started as a salad for breakfast. It was great, light, refreshing and tasty.. They were accompaniments to a light breakfast.  Only on a few weekends, we would start the day with sprouts alone to break the fast. After a few years, there was a change in breakfast. I converted to dosais or idlis with whole grains, millets or unpolished rice varieties. Hence, sprouts were shifted to be part of the lunch platter. Fresh salad with carrots, cucumber or any salad veggies with liberal juice of lemon, went with lunch.

 
Here, there arose a problem. While packing lunch in the morning, the freshness of the sprouts was lost.  I moved it further evening as a replacement for tea/coffee. Now, I couldn’t survive without my coffee. If coffee was consumed with a healthy stuff, I believe the goodness of the healthy food is eaten up by caffeine in coffee and tea. Tell me I’m wrong, and I shall include my lonely coffee with breakfast, lunch and dinner too.

Coming back to sprouts, I switched it over to evening.. as a snack during tea. Then, winter set in. The fresh sprouts wouldn’t go well raw, cold with fresh veggies- I wanted something hot for the chilly weather. Additionally, the sprouted black gram was posing problems to chew . I thought of cooking or braising it to make it softer. While we had elders as guests, it made a lighter healthier snack while cooked… Easy to munch and tastier with South Indian seasoning- mustard seeds, curry leaves and chillies. A great snack for a cold winter evening. I have to mention here, I had my coffee after sufficient time gap.

Beyond the health benefits, sprouts are a beauty to watch grow. They mark the beginning of growth or existence. One can truly see the glow of new life in the sprouted seeds. If you feel I am excessively exaggerating, please try for yourself.

There are different ways to sprout seeds. This is what I do.

Soak seeds overnight. Drain water. Pat dry with a clean kitchen towel. Place in a clean dry box and close with a damp cheese cloth. Shake every now and then. Be careful, if there is too much water in the seeds, they would attract fungal growth. If they are too dry, they wouldn’t sprout. It might take a few times to understand the process and succeed.

Note: Green gram sprouts quickly. Fenugreek is a bit sticky. Black gram poses greater problems… It  attracts fungus very easily. But be patient… Do not lose hope.. Slow comprehension of the process of each seed would help flawless sprouting, even after a few failures.

Health Benefits of Sprouts

Pre-digested foods refer to the foods that have been pre-digested for us either by another animal or machines or equipment. The nutrients are in pre-digested form, so they require very little digestion, and the nutrients are easily absorbed into the bloodstream. Thus, an elemental diet provides you nutritional needs while giving your digestive system at rest. Sprouts nutrition reduces high blood pressure, helps in weight loss, lowers cardiovascular risk and helps us to fight against diabetes and fatty liver.

https://www.google.co.in/amp/www.thefitindian.com/sprouts-for-weight-loss/amp/

To know more about benefits of sprouts, google has loads of information.

Suggestions on how to include sprouts in your meal pattern

These salads are vey flexible, one can alter all ingredients as per preference.  These are only a few suggestions. Usage is purely one’s own imagination or innovation.

Sprouts Salad -1

Ingredients (serves appr.  3)

  • sprouted green gram – 2 cups
  • sprouted fenugreek seeds – 1/2 cup
  • grated carrots – 2 cups
  • pomegranate – seeds of 1 fruit

Mix all together and season if needed with salt,  pepper and lemon. This tastes awesome without any seasoning too.

Sprouts Salad – 2

 

Ingredients

  • sprouted green gram – 2 cups
  • sprouted fenugreek seeds – 1/2 cup
  • finely chopped or grated carrots – 1 cup
  • finely chopped onions – 1 cup
  • finely chopped green chillies – 2 no.s

 

Mix all together and season with salt,  pepper and lemon.

Steamed or Cooked Version of Sprouts: Sprouts Sundal

Ingredients

  • sprouted black chick pea – 1 cup
  • sprouted green gram – 1 cup
  • sprouted fenugreek seeds – 1/2 cup
  • finely chopped onions – 1 cup
  • finely chopped green chillies – 2 no.s

seasoning

  • oil – 1 tblsp
  • mustard seeds – 1 tsp
  • dehusked black gram – 1 tsp
  • curry leaves – a few
  • asafoetida – 1/4 tsp
  • salt – as needed

Method of Preparation

  1. Cook sprouts in very little water. One can pressure cook with 3/4 cup water for 2 whistles in full burner
  2. Or saute the sprouts and cover and cook in a closed pan
  3. Heat oil in a pan, let mustards splutter, then add black gram
  4. When black gram turns golden, add curry leaves, chopped onions and chillies
  5. Then, add the  cooked and drained sprouts, salt and mix well
  6. When they are mixed well, sprinkle asafoetida and switch off stove
  7. Sprouts Sundal is ready to be served.

Kariveppilai Yennai/Traditional Hair Oil with Curry Leaves

 

Kariveppilai is the Tamil name for Curry leaves. It roughly translates as neem leaf used in curries –  Kari+Veppilai – Veppilai is Neem Leaf. It looks almost like neem leaf, but doesn’t carry the bitterness of neem. The wonderful aroma of the curry leaf when fried, makes it a great agent for seasoning in many dishes. Having known the medicinal effects and health benefits this exceptional tree possesses, the Tamils have been including the curry leaf in varied usages.

  

    

They are considered to have anti-diabetic, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and hepatoprotective (capability to protect the liver from damage) properties. The roots are used for treating body aches and the bark is used for snake bite relief.

The main nutrients found in curry leaves are carbohydrates, energy, fiber, calcium, phosphorous, iron, magnesium, copper, and minerals. [1] It also contains various vitamins like nicotinic acid and vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin E, antioxidants, plant sterols, amino acids, glycosides, and flavonoids. Also, nearly zero fat (0.1 g per 100 g) is found in them.

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/health-benefits-of-curry-leaves.html

    

Apart from these scientific facts, the main benefits that home makers for generations have been telling their off springs are-

kariveppilai/curry leaf is-

  •  good for eyes
  • good for digestion
  • important in maintaining darker hair colour
  • a natural coolant

  
When we used to leave aside the fried curry leaf from the chutney, from the sambar, from the kuzhambu/curries on our plates, amma would scold us to chew and finish it off. We would reluctantly do it or sometimes quarrel and throw it away. Then she would secretly add the leaves -powdered- in many dishes… we would unknowingly consume it.  Now, as a mother, I am scolding my daughter to wipe the plate clean chewing all extra curry leaves, and am also trying to inculcate the valued curry leaves in many dishes, without my child’s attention. No fault here with the curry leaf, but some genetic disorder of setting aside chewable things from blended dips.

    

Curry leaves are herbs that are known to have essential nutrients that help in conditions like weight loss, blood pressure, indigestion, anaemia, diabetes, acne, hair loss, et al. These aromatic leaves, also known as kadi patta, have nutrients like copper, calcium, phosphorus, fibre, carbohydrates, energy, magnesium and iron. They also possess many types of vitamins like vitamins A, B, C and E and amino acids beneficial for health. 

https://www.ndtv.com/food/curry-leaves-benefits-use-kadi-patta-for-your-health-beauty-and-hair-1861407

    

  
The specific usage of the curry leaf in preparing Hair Oil is the topic of this post. Curry Leaf Oil is a great coolant for the hot climate of the southern part of India, especially Tamilnadu. It also tackles early greying of hair and aids in hair growth – whether applied as oil or consumed in various dishes. 

I have used kariveppilai yennai when young and still see appa (father) use it. We also make fun of his moustache having turned grey sooner than his hair, thanks to the kariveppilai yennai/ curry leaf oil. The aroma of curry leaves slowly cooked in coconut oil for the purpose of black, thick hair, takes me to my childhood.

  

fresh and dried leaves

  
Original curry leaf oil is made in a more refined/step-by-step process-

Curry leaves are blended with very little water – in those days made into a paste with ammi – roller stone

  1. They are then flattened into thin round cookies – approximately 1 1/2 to 2 inches diameter, on a muslin cloth or plastic sheet
  2. These are sun-dried for days until the ground curry leaf sheets come out of the cloth, completely dried
  3. These dried thins are slow cooked in coconut oil, until the colour and aroma of the curry leaf is completely extracted
  4. This is done when the oil stops to splutter or approximately 30 minutes of slow cooking
  5. Extra curry leaf thins/sheets are stored for next oil preparation
  6. The same is done with marudhani/henna while making henna oil.

  
Here, I have not followed the same procedure. I took the short cut method of sun drying kariveppilai directly and slow cooked in oil. There is no compromise in the quality of oil, in comparison to the previous traditional technique – the aroma and colour seems to be the same.  While using the curry leaf thins/sheets, they would settle down in the bottom of the bottle and leave a clear residue on top, but here- the dried curry leaves occupy more space in the bottle and yet, the oil on top is a clear residue. Later, when the oil is mixed too much with the leaves, one can filter and use.
  

Kariveppilaii Yennai/ Hair Oil with Curry Leaves


  

Ingredients

  • good quality pure coconut oil – 1 litre
  • dried curry leaves – appr. 6 cups

  
Method of Preparation
  

Sun dried curry leaves

  1. Pluck curry leaves from tree/plant or buy enough from the vendor
  2. De-stem leaves and wash very well
  3. Spread on a clean cloth and pat dry

  


  

4. Place the cloth in a sunny area and dry well in the sun – might take  few days to completely dry without moisture



  
5. Once the leaves are dried, they are ready to be used in the oil.

  
Making the Oil

  1. In a wide pan, pour pure coconut oil – see label for aromatic ingredients, other oils which might have been mixed with coconut oil. We need only 100% coconut oil – preferably cold-pressed. Most branded coconut oils are refined, can’t help.. proceed.
  2. Measure 6 cups dried curry leaves and mix in the oil, before it turns hot. If dried leaves are added after oil is heated up, the leaves would be fried and  would give out a burnt smell. Hence, drop the leaves in, while the temperature of oil is normal.

  

  

3. Once the oil starts to heat up, simmer the stove and let the leaves cook in oil for about 30 minutes, till the colour of oil starts to darken.

  

a little later – darker oil

  
4. Switch off and let the oil cool.
  

5. Store oil with curry leaves in a bottle and use everyday.


  

Learning Life’s Beautiful Lessons…

Firstly, my sincere regrets and apologies for having disappeared for quite a long time.

When other priorities push your zeal to the backseat, the zeal to perform has to wait. I suppose that’s what happened with me. When life suddenly showered upon a new ‘Bucket List’ of various ‘Family Packages’, the writer in me had to wait for a while.  But the inquisitive learner in me never stopped working.

A self proclaimed ‘hard core optimist’ that I am,  I’ve come back after this break, with wonderful experiences of peeping into Grandma’s kitchen once more, ofcourse which is presently Amma’s kitchen… the speciality being the presence of the nonagenarian aachi (grandmother). I was lucky enough to play  the role of the little grand daughter again to my grandmother, getting loads of life tips, family stories and sharing non-stop giggles.  Interestingly, I seem to have grown younger with the help of the  time machine called aachi.

Sometimes, God showers lifetime experiences that one would seldom expect.

This break showered me with an experience of sharing the same roof with young at heart oldies set apart by three decades. My grandmother who is 90;  my father in the 70s club; and my mother – probably one of the most patient and pragmatic ladies, in her sixties…. taking care of everyone. Being spectators to the daily routines of the three were me and my daughter of 11.

Now… I think you would understand my over whelmed joy to just observe and immerse myself in the role of a spectator…. and daily ‘Walk the Talk’ with these interesting personalities.

More than a food enthusiast, I have become a life style enthusiast with age. These special months have enlightened me to accept things in life, and let go many worries that we dump our soul sacks with.

Wouldn’t these elders from 60-90 years have issues related to food, health, fitness, relationships and loneliness? Tackling all these, along with the inability to do things they could do a decade ago…. is truly a catalyst to many agonies. But the time their bodies have taken to age has provided their minds and hearts with the great art of graciously accepting their own old age and its limitations.

One of the many lessons I learnt was to focus on enthusiastic diversions, that would provide the fervour to tackle the fast pace of life, as well as life’s various complications that never cease to diminish with age and with growing children.  These elders seemed to have their own interests they were engaged and occupied, throughout the day.

Am I still a Blogger or an amateur Philosopher??? No, No, Not yet.  When I analyse in isolation, all through the journey of ‘dosaikal’, I had aimed for a deep rooted cultural transfer from my previous generations to my next. The precious months those passed by, have given me a sense of satisfaction and great joy of having provided some of life’s beautiful lessons to my daughter. Especially, I was witness to the transfer of unconditional Love and Passion for Life from a 90 year old great grandmother to a 11 year old great grand daughter in the most beautiful manner ever possible.

Incidentally, my previous post has also been one inspired by the energetic old lady.  This might seem like a repetition post … but the passion and zeal of life that I observed in her tied me up to sit back, relax and relish those special moments… inhaling every micro second of it.

The 90 year old seemed the most energetic among the three. Though Amma (mother), who is the care taker of the household, is the most active, beyond her physical problems, Aachi (grandmother) astonished me with her briskness and memory. This is what made me explore more on the life styles of our elders.

I started thinking about healthy life style that is emphasised by authors, dieticians, diabetologists, food researchers and amateur foodies like me too. Now,  what makes our previous generation a healthier community than us.  And is that the real truth that they are a healthier lot than us? We might be a medically developed world… but what makes us fall prey to simple and complex diseases that immobilise us from performing our routine chores? With so much knowledge available on various platforms, what makes us scroll for more and more ideas on healthy life style? Why haven’t we been able to find a path… stop the search and proceed?

Have we ignored the wealth of knowledge that our own elders provide, live and exhibit every day…as we spend so much time searching the net for remedies.  We have converted our beautiful homes into mechanical dwelling houses .. where machines and gadgets live for more hours than our human hearts.  We are driven by advertisements  -provided by Retail companies and Spiritual Gurus alike.

Going back to traditional values, observing and absorbing what our previous generations ate, actively did and very actively avoided might provide a satisfactory result. Be mindful, we are intelligent enough to separate those unwanted logics too from the lives and beliefs of our elders. But most importantly, those life style markers that might pull us back from entering into Diabetic/Hyper tension Platforms… leave aside  Alzheimer and Amnesia…. could be identified from their life style.

Why I repeatedly go back to my grandmother is for her memory to narrate stories and  name members of the unbelievably huge extended family that she hailed from. At ninety, to squat and draw ‘maakkolam’- the intricate drawings on entrances with rice flour paste and chopping vegetables with ease is a sight of astonishment.  This is not only a physical ability… but the mental vigor to keep working, help and share the burden of the daughter-in-law. There is an inbuilt mechanism of stress busting, by chatting and diverting her mind into many other simple daily chores… and the remarkable fact is that… this stress busting technique comes unknowingly and is triggered unconsciously… no therapists to guide.

So, the simple moral I learnt is to observe our previous generations, inhale the best techniques that make them live a life with lesser ailments, or live a life that makes them feel there were lesser ailments or no great ailmemnts at all. It is a mind technique that came genetically, that we fail to inherit because of the so-called advancement in science and life style.

After this extensive food for thought, its time for real food for the tummy. With the same passion of zeal, I believe to have inherited from my grandma, I started exploring a few spots in Chennai and here are a few delicacies that I experimented in my kitchen…
 

Walnut Crackers


 

Amazingly perfect bread

 
Puttu

 
100% whole wheat Buns


 
Healthy roasted mixture


 
Pudhina Panagam (lime and mint -jaggery coolant for summer)


 

Green Apple Mint Juice

Thanks to my little angel, who brought me back from the awestruck state of mind to reality- to write more for her and for myself.

Pooti Aachi Vengaya Thuvayal – Great Grandmother’s Onion Chutney

 


  

This post is a tribute to the almost nonagenarian, my 89 year old grandmother-aachi, whose kitchen I peeped into as a kid. It has been a beautiful journey of love, love and love alone – millions of life’s lessons learnt from thousands of chatting sessions. The soft yet strong hands have produced en-numerous delicacies with tonnes of affection. I see those soft hands that have turned wrinkled and bony… and realize life’s harsh truths. The truth of aging, might not be as bad as I sound.. as we learn the art of aging graciously. But seeing our elders age is certainly one among the severest truths.

  


  

When I hold those hands now, I feel the same warmth among those pressing bones that protrude. How many nei urundais (lentils sweet) and pathirpeni (sugary crisps) and murukkus (savoury crisps) have these hands made and served, the taste still lingering in our minds…
 
When I see the glittering child like smile amidst those few clinging teeth and skinny cheeks, I long for the same energetic glee that has welcomed us home from school…
 
When I now listen to the never ending stories through the tired voice, I hope to hear the tamil songs sung to me and the gossips of the household with the same youthful tone…
 
When I look into those wrinkled sleepy eyes, I think of those youthful eyes that admired my every move…
 

But.. the joy of having aachis/grandmothers to tell you stories and admire your children is certainly a boon.
  

at work – great grandmother and great grand daughter


  

When I see my little daughter enjoy the company of Pooti Aachi/Great Grandmother and play several games, I am astonished by the connect of an almost ninety year old with a nine year old and also the other way round! The passion to connect can well be understood by today’s generation of social networks. This is a great connect, that needs no wi-fi. This is the generational link that passes through four generations of interdependent relationships. Quite amazing..truly no words to express.

This is yet another trademark Aachi’s recipe. This storable Onion Chutney is simply the best of chutneys and a great preserve. It can be stored for weeks without a refrigerator. But.. brush your teeth before meeting people.. these are onions and garlic.

The name normally associated with the thuvayal/chutney is vengaya thuvayal or onion chutney. But when it became my daughter’s most favorite chutney, she renamed it as ‘Pooti Aachi Vengaya Thuvayal’ – what else could suit the best of dishes – with the four generational connect. So each time we go home, this is packed on demand…

Due to old age, pooti aachi/great grand ma doesn’t make it anymore. It is made by her daugther-in-law – Amma who has been making this for decades now. But, aachi insists to stand behind to guide, so that nothing is missed. Such emphasis on perfection… certain traits of old age one can’t avoid, I suppose. Though Amma makes the same Great Grandmother’s Onion Chutney to perfection, but she needs to wait a few more decades to earn that name- ‘Pooti Aachi’ and the chutney to be named after her.

So, this post is completely in admiration of that Grand Lady of True Affection, whom I always long would stay with me forever.
  

Pooti Aachi Vengaya Thuvayal
  


  

The chutney is a very simple one, that involves patience and care… the same qualities that I respect my Aachi for.
  

Ingredients
  


  

To grind-

  • chinna vengayam/shallots – 4 cups (appr. 600 gms peeled)
  • poondu/garlic – 1 cup – (appr. 150 gms peeled)
  • milagai vatral/red chillies – 10 no.s

  
For Tempering-

  • nallennai/gingelly oil – 1/2 cup
  • kadugu/mustard seeds – 2 tsp
  • kariveppilai/curry leaves – 3 tbsp

  
Seasoning-

  • salt – to taste
  • juice of 2 small lemons

  
Method of Preparation

1. Wash and peel shallots and garlic and cut into random pieces

2. Fry red chillies in droplets of oil, this helps the seeds to grind well with onion and garlic


  

3. First dry grind the roasted red chillies and then grind the shallots and garlic with chillies into a smooth paste


  

4. In a heavy bottomed pan, heat 1/4 cup oil

5. Drop the mustard seeds and once they splutter, simmer stove and add curry leaves

6. Fry for a few seconds and pour the blended paste

7. Increase the flame and bring it to boil


  

8. Then, simmer again and let this mixture cook well – it would take at least 20 minutes to reach a thicker consistency.

9. Do not add salt till this stage. As the mixture thickens, we will need lesser salt

10. Add salt and tell it thicken more… say another 5 minutes

11. When the colour of the chutney reaches brown colour .. remember it was off-white in the beginning, add juice of 1 big lemon or 2 small lemons
  

from off-white


 

to brown


  

12. Once the lemon juice is incorporated, we can notice the colour change in the thuvayal from brown to black.

13. Do not overcook after adding lemon juice…as it will make the chutney bitter

14. After addition of lemon juice, the time needed would be approximately  3 minutes for the chutney to be ready


  

15. Enjoy with all kinds of Idlies and Dosais or even breads and rotis…why not!!

Dosaikal after six years …

After almost six years of blogging, this is my first layout makeover for dosaikal.com. Hope this new makeover that I’ve tried to give Dosaikal enthuses you all as much as me. This is an attempt to make this blog more colorful and show facets of growing better. Whether I’ve been successful in the latter…. I leave the decision to my readers.

Good practice or bad, I’ve always been in search of logical reasons in whatever I do or whatever happens to me. So, how did I let the ‘Change Bug’ enter my courtyard??

That needs a brief flash back…..

This is how I introduced myself to the wide world of readers when Dosaikal started.

 

 

“A simple person who believes strong roots and values build up stronger generations; and good food and good food habits are one of the best gifts that one can give to their off springs.”

 

 
Now, I look at my daughter. Those delicate hands that helped me mix eggs, then tried to bake the basic cakes – has started making ably stuffed whole wheat pies, healthy vegetable omelettes, chocolate coated popcorns, and also chopping vegetables and fruits with great accuracy and more. This I think has been the most prominent of all signs of positive growth that has happened through Dosaikal and to Dosaikal, the blog. And not to miss – the additional signs of me growing physically older I suppose. Fact is Fact, accepted.

I am partly happy to have introduced her to the wonderful world of good food and good food habits.
 

 

“To Provide is in the nature of the Soil and to Absorb and Bear Fruit is in the Nature of the Seed; I leave it to the child to hold responsible for her understanding of Good Food, from what has been provided through me.”

 

 
Thank you very much for having traveled with me in my pursuit towards providing good values through good food, and thereby strong roots to the generations to come.

Let’s continue our journey together…

 

The Traditional Rice Varieties of Tamilnadu

The traditional harvest festival of the Tamils –  ‘Pongal’ is almost here. It falls on the 14th of January, 2017. Wishing everyone ‘Happy Pongal’ is the easiest way to wish on any occasion with a ‘Happy’ prefixed. But Pongal is the Day of the Farmer. It is the festival to respect the Farmer and his Cattle, for the relentless service in providing staple grains and millets to the society. It can also be the ‘Thanks Giving Festival of the Tamils’. We call it ‘UZHAVAR THIRUNAL’  in Tamil or ‘THE SPECIAL DAY OF THE FARMER’.

When one of our friends introduced us to a wide range of traditional rice varieties of Tamilnadu, what more special an occasion could I wait for, than a post on the Harvest Festival. Hence, I reserved it for Uzhavar Thirunal/Pongal. Though I have become a better user of millets of my state, and those special millets have become a regular feature of the breakfast table, these rice varieties were only reading material till date to me. Or more, a topic of discussion in Farmer’s Programmes across national channels.

Unfortunately, not much historical or research information could be found in the net. But fortunately, much has been written recently and much more information could be found through videos of specialized farmers and practitioners of traditional Tamil medicine. I could feel a sudden urge among media enthusiasts, to popularize these traditional grains – in a genuine interest to protect the grains from getting lost in the huge piles of junk/fast and processed foods in the super market and to protect those farmers whose livelihood has never been appreciated as the Farmers of the West.

As two sides of every coin…the ever rising health issues is truly the factor of concern. To protect the elite class and the section of the people who urge to reach the elite class from Obesity, Diabetes, Blood Pressure and a wide range of Life Style oriented diseases, there is this new rise in the introduction of traditional grains and millets.  What is sown by the simple farmer is reaped as benefit by the trendy super markets with trendier gunny bags to store tradition at its grandest.

Coming to the grains that I was introduced to – A very special thanks to Mrs. and Mr. T.

Here are a few grains that have been part of the traditional rice eating habit of the Tamils across centuries and more. I have tried to present the nutritional facts of the specific rice variety with the link from which I could gather the information. For any interested reader – Just type the name of the rice, and one would come across the very few websites which explain the benefits.

I wish to post the different foods that can be prepared from these grains in the near future… may be Paniyaram, Pongal, Idly or Dosai.

 

These are the different varieties of rice presently with me.  ARISI is rice in Tamil language.

  1. Karuppu Kavuni Arisi
  2. Sivappu Kavuni Arisi
  3. Karunkuruvai Arisi
  4. Moongil Arisi
  5. Kullankar Arisi
  6. Kudavazhai Arisi
  7. Kaatuyaanam Arisi
  8. Maappillai Arisi

 

img_7841

 

 

  1. Karuppu Kavuni Arisi – Black variety

 

img_7829

 

img_7868

 

This rice is believed to increase bone strength and prevent bone related ailments. It contains anti-oxidants equivalent to blue berries. It cures the problem of loss of appetite in children and also rectifies nutritional deficiencies.

Different foods that can be made from kavuni arisi are – paniyaram –sweet and spicy, payasam, pongal, dosai, puttu etc

http://swarnaprashana.org/the-miracle-rice-karuppu-kavuni-arisi-black-kavuni-rice/

 

2. Sivappu Kavuni Arisi – Red variety

This is the red variant of the black kavuni rice.

 

img_7832

 

img_7862

 

3. Karunkuruvai Arisi

 

img_7827

 

img_7840

 

Karunkuruvai arisi is believed to control Diabetes and Cholesterol levels and is also a Blood Pressure regulator. It also improves the strength of the body.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6tM2_tQrbc 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghDyu-p0iqw

-are video links in Tamil that talk of the benefits of the grain.

 

4. Moongil Arisi/Bamboo Rice

 

img_7830

 

img_7884

 

It is popular among the people of Kerala and is called Mulayari in Malayalam.  Bamboo Rice is collected from the seeds of the Bamboo flower. Some species of bamboos only bloom with flowers once in 40-60 years and often die after flowering. They compensate this by releasing huge amounts of flowers and seeds.

http://healthyliving.natureloc.com/bamboo-rice-mulayari-hidden-tribal-secret-revealed/

These key points specify the health benefits of the grain.

  1. Studies conducted on the Kani tribes in Kanyakumari forests have shown that they consume Bamboo rice for its fertility enhancing properties.
  2. Higher protein content than both rice and wheat.
  3. Controls Joints pain, back pain and rheumatic pain.
  4. Lowers cholesterol levels
  5. Good source of vitamin B6
  6. Has anti-diabetic properties

https://blog.naturallyyours.in/2016/02/26/6-reasons-why-you-should-have-bamboo-rice/

One can also learn a few facts in Tamil from the below mentioned link-

http://www.valaitamil.com/moongil-arisi-benefits_12692.html

 

5. Kullankar Arisi

 

img_7837

 

img_7873

This rice possesses antioxidental properties, and has higher zinc and iron content than white rices. They also strengthen, regenerate, and energize the body, regulate blood pressure, and prevent skin diseases and premature aging. Kullakkar rice contains complex carbohydrates that are good for health.

This rice is suitable to make idly, dosai and kanji /porridge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kullakar_rice

 

6. Kudavaazhai Arisi

 

img_7831

img_7851

http://thanal.co.in/resource/view/save-our-rice-tamilnadu–part-11–seeraga-samba-sivappu-kudavazhai-an-indigenous-rice-varieties-by-rjayaraman-70181242

The link above shows a short interview with Farmer R. Jayaraman, who specializes in indigenous rice varieties of Tamilnadu.

He says this rice plays an important role in the health of pregnant women and aids in easy child birth.

 

7. Kattuyanam Arisi

 

img_7825

img_7844

 

The name has two parts – kadu meaning forest and yanai meaning elephant. As Sidha Maruthuvar (Doctor of Traditional Tamil Medicine) Dr. Rajamanickam says, the grain in the field grows more than 7 foot tall and even an elephant can disappear amidst the crop. Hence the name to this indigenous healthy rice variety is Kattuyaanam.

It controls Diabetes, improves over all health of children, boosts immunity and protects against skin problems

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODSWQ9XJt5c

 

 8. Mappillai Samba Arisi

 

img_7826

img_7892

Mappillai Samba Rice variety increases stamina, provides energy especially for school going/studying children.  It specifically aids helps build a healthy body and an alert mind

Idly, Dosai, Pongal or Kanji/Porridge can be made from this rice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSEUZimXm18

 

Farmer’s Day Wishes to everyone. Uzhavar Thirunal Nalvazhthukkal.

Cheeni Kizhangu/Sarkkarai Valli Kizhangu-Karuppatti/Sweet Potatoes in Palm Sugar Syrup

 

sweet potato soaked in palm jaggery syrup

IMG_4526

 

I have very less memories of Sarkkarai Valli Kizhangu or Cheeni Kizhangu – Sweet Potato as a vegetable. But I have evergreen memories of sweet potatoes floating in a tub of Palm syrup in Thoothukudi, my maternal grandmother’s house.

The big chatti or hot vessel filled with sweet aromatic Palm jaggery syrup and the  floating sweet potatoes inside was one of my favorites. Of course, still is. Mildly spiced with dry ginger for balance and added digestion, this delicacy can be had hot, warm or cold.

Cubed or Circled Sweet Potato pieces cooked in Palm Jaggery Syrup is a sweet coated with Divinity. No, it isn’t served for the Gods but the Divinity comes from its soaked flavor. The naturally mildly sweet Sweet Potato dipped in the flavorful Palm Jaggery Syrup offers a unique aroma and taste different from the other well-known sweets of Tamilnadu.

This might be termed as a healthy sweet as there is no frying involved.

 

Why should we stick to Traditional Foods?

 

IMG_3893IMG_2882IMG_8336

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you believe in  –

 

  • the whole wheat breads of market that offer 50 % refined flour and still take the name ‘whole wheat’?
  • the baked chips with loads of sodium that still claim to be 0% cholesterol?
  • the high sugar/banned low sugar or honey filled granular bars that claim to be health snacks to start the day?
  • the mostly refined ready to eat whole grain cereals that are sent through high heat to be moisture free for longer shelf life?
  • and additionally, do you believe in the never-ending list of hazardous goodies that cheat us in the name of health food?

 

If you don’t believe in the above, then I’d suggest you to try out the traditional recipes of each culture.

Believe me!

These Sweet Potatoes –

  1. cooked in Palm Jaggery
  2. soaked well in the same syrup
  3. not deep-fried
  4. do not possess the minutest droplet of butter, ghee or oil
  5. no added milk or coconut milk
  6. no added cream or coconut cream

– can be claimed fat-free, gluten-free, free from milk and milk products, no allergic nuts involved in making, no soy products and so on.
Fortunately,  there is no claim of traditional sweets to be fat-free – no tagged promises. As there cannot be any food that could be completely fat-free/sugar-free/chemical free/ and to top the list – that is suitable for all. It is for the consumers to identify what suits their family, more importantly what suits their pocket and most importantly what suits their family’s health and well-being. But staying away from products that have higher shelf life and those beautifully arranged in the stores, could definitely be a healthier choice for the family, especially with growing children.

This simple logic has made me believe and rely completely on traditional foods. They don’t stay longer – reason one, we lick the bowls to our heart’s content and then, they have no added preservatives to stay long and tempt us longer. They can be high in calories, high in sugar, high in cholesterol as analyzed by dietitians. But, they are at a comfort kitchen zone where the intolerant levels can be altered.

Hence, while one cannot alter the sugar content of sweet potatoes, feel free to alter the amount of Palm jaggery used in the recipe.

 

Sweet Potatoes and the South East Asian Connection

 

 

I am amazed by the connection of south East Asian cuisine with the cuisine of Tamilnadu. On our visit to Indonesia, I could taste the same Cheeni kizhangu karuppatti in Indonesia, but with the twist of taste with coconut milk. Yummy Treat! The same Sweet Potato in different parts of the world can be used in different ways. But the abundance of Palm and Palm Sugar and Coconut and Coconut Milk has given way to a number of common recipes among the different countries of South-East Asia, Srilanka and Southern India that share sea space. This cuisine connect is also a remarkable proof of the successful maritime trade between Tamilnadu and other South East Asian Countries extending till China, the give and take of several recipes twisted to local tastes.

Here is the name of the delicacies with almost the same preparation. Please correct me for errors.

Indonesian – 

Biji Salak – Sweet Potato Dumplings cooked in Palm Sugar Syrup and flavoured with coconut milk and Pandan (screw pine) leaves and thickened with tapioca flour

Kolak Biji Salak – The above mentioned sweet with the addition of Bananas

Malaysian – 

Bubur Cha Cha – Sweet porridge made with 3 kinds of differently coloured sweet potatoes, yam, tapioca pearls (sago),  bananas and black eyed beans, thickened with tapioca flour and added flavor with coconut milk and Pandan leaves

Singaporean – 

BoBo Cha Cha – Bubur Cha Cha is also called BoBo Cha Cha and made with a mixture of different colored tapioca pearls. http://www.singaporelocalfavourites.com/2010/08/easy-bo-bo-cha-cha-recipe.html

 

Now, to the Tamil Recipe –

Cheeni Kizhangu Karuppatti/ Sweet Potatoes in Palm Jaggery Syrup

 

IMG_4523

 

Ingredients

  • cheeni kizhangu/sweet potatoes – 1/2 kg
  • karuppatti/palm jaggery – 1/4 kg
  • chukku podi/dry ginger powder – 1 tsp
  • elakkai podi/cardamom powder – 1 tsp
  • water – 250 ml and little more for potatoes to float

 

Method of Preparation
1. Wash and peel sweet potatoes

2. Cut them into circles preferably or cubes as per the size of potatoes

 

image

 

3. In a pan, place Palm jaggery and water and heat slightly till jaggery completely dissolves

4. Filter the liquid as Cane or Palm jaggery always consist impurities/mud

5. Take this liquid in a wide and hard bottomed pan and add dry ginger powder and cardamom powder

 

image
6. Add the cut sweet potatoes and add little more water if potatoes don’t have enough syrup to float

 

7. Slow cook sweet potatoes in the Palm syrup till done

image

 

8. Pressure cooking would result in mashed potatoes; Slow cooking the pieces in the syrup not only enhances the flavor but also helps in perfectly soft and spoon-able pieces

9. By the time the potatoes are cooked, the syrup would have thickened a bit

10. Yet there would be enough syrup for the sweet potatoes to float in

11. Enjoy this delicious sweet hot or cold.

 

IMG_4509

 

Note:

  1. If you have access to different colored sweet potatoes, just indulge – do not worry about the color.
  2. If there is no Palm jaggery available, try using powdered Palm sugar available in Thai markets, or use any unrefined cane sugar or jaggery.  No white sugar here please.
  3. If the potatoes are huge in size – slice in halves, if the circles turn out to be too big
  4. If preferred, this sweet can also be converted into a Payasam/Kheer, with the addition of coconut milk (like the Indonesian Biji Sala)